A journey into the eyes and mind of a naturalist.

A Year in my Yard: Summer Stars

Summer has set in and the heat and humidity are making it known.  The flurry of flowers between spring and early summer have come and gone while the familiar faces of summer are settling in for their turn.

Motherwort

June 21:  Motherwort


Thistle

June 21:  Canada Thistle

As I am identifying the flowers on my property I am beginning to learn the history of the land.  What I am finding is a story of disturbance and inconsistency.  Many of the flowers I have photographed outside my manicured (used in the slighted use of the word) are either foreign invaders or natives that thrive with disturbance.  These first two flowers are examples of each.  The motherwort is a native that thrives and forest edges.  In a natural setting, this would be in blowdowns, fires or other places the forest has opened up.  Here I found it where my lawn meets the forest.  The Canada Thistle is a foreign invader from our neighbors to the north.  It also thrives and proliferates in disturbed soils, so much so that I have attempted to remove as many of the flowers, before they go to seed, as possible.  This is a tough decision to make as the flowers serve as a valuable food source for pollinators.

 June 21:  Common Elderberry

Here is another native that thrives with disturbance.  Each of these flowers will become a very edible berry after it is pollinated.  The berries are good to eat provided you can beat the birds to them!

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June 21-26:  Echinacea

Here is one of the masters of the native plants, echinacea, the mighty cone flower.  This flower and its allies dominated the native prairies, grasslands and savannahs for thousands of years before the plow.  The pictures above are all  of the same individual flower, taken over several days.  The petals expand and fill with color as they mature.  The bees, flies, butterflies and moths were eagerly awaiting the production of nectar, “testing” the flower from the moment it emerged.

IMG_0995

June 21:  Gaillardia (I think…)


Lily_pink

June 26:  Pink Lily

 June 21:  Stinging Nettles

Here is a great example of different strategies flowers use to reproduce.  Some flowers like the lily, pictured above, produce one large flower with a large reservoir of nectar and pollen. This single flower can produce multiple seeds.  The Gaillardia, also pictured above, is a composite flower meaning that it is actually hundreds of tiny flowers pushed together.  Each of these tiny flowers can only produce one seed each, but because they are numerous, one flower head can produce hundreds of tiny seeds.   Yet another adaptation is exemplified by the stinging nettles.  It too produces a plethora of small flowers but in less organized groups.  Each small flower will produce a single seed.

Bedstraw

June 26:  Bedstraw

This has to be the smallest flower I have seen all year.  Each tiny bloom is only a couple of millimeters in diameter.  These flowers must surely be pollinated by small flies as anything larger wouldn’t be able to land on the stem let alone access the nectar at the bottom of the flower.

Catnip

June 26:  Catnip

Cats as pollinators??  Think about that for a while….

 

 

Catnip is in the mint family.  The flowers are clustered radially around the square stem.  I have other members of the mint family coming in a future post so make a note to compare the flower shape, color, and patterns!

Is there another flower in this post that’s in the mint family?  Go back and see if you can figure it out!!

 

 

 

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